vazelodian:

science?!?!?!

(Source: unexplained-events, via holeintheuniverse)

historicaltimes:

The Telefontornet connecting some 5,000 phone lines in Stockholm, 1890.

historicaltimes:

The Telefontornet connecting some 5,000 phone lines in Stockholm, 1890.

(via northernuniform)

32062 Mcalpin, Fl

32062 Mcalpin, Fl

austinkleon:

Thumbnail drawings from Henry David Thoreau’s journals

Thoreau left all sorts of little thumbnail drawings in his journals, and as Linda Holt Brown points out in her paper, “The Zen Drawings of H.D. Thoreau” (these images come from her great accompanying PowerPoint), many of them have a wonderful Zen quality to them.

John Cage liked them so much he blew them up and projected them behind some of his performances. (See also: his print composite of the drawings.)

(via holeintheuniverse)

red-lipstick:

Aris Moore (New Hampshire, USA) - Untitled     Drawings

red-lipstick:

Aris Moore (New Hampshire, USA) - Untitled     Drawings

(Source: peekadoo.blogspot.com)

sixpenceee:

Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically? 
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically? 

SOURCE

(via discoverynews)

discoverynews:

Sea Urchin-Inspired House Captures Tidal Energy
If you’ve ever dreamed of having a seafront home shaped like a sea urchin — who hasn’t? — then hold onto your swim fins.
The Hydroelectric Tidal House, envisioned by architectural designer Margot Krasojević, draws inspiration from some of nature’s weirdest sea creatures — echinoderms like starfish and sea urchins whose symmetrical shapes have long fascinated biologists. Learn more

discoverynews:

Sea Urchin-Inspired House Captures Tidal Energy

If you’ve ever dreamed of having a seafront home shaped like a sea urchin — who hasn’t? — then hold onto your swim fins.

The Hydroelectric Tidal House, envisioned by architectural designer Margot Krasojević, draws inspiration from some of nature’s weirdest sea creatures — echinoderms like starfish and sea urchins whose symmetrical shapes have long fascinated biologists. Learn more

weissesrauschen:

841 by François Van Damme on Flickr.

weissesrauschen:

841 by François Van Damme on Flickr.

satellite-delight:

28.138274,-16.644438

28.148091,-16.666866

yelibun:

Reading a stranger’s diary from the 1970s

yelibun:

Reading a stranger’s diary from the 1970s

(via thestrangeways)

fuckyeahabandonedplaces:

Emptiness by newfrontier08 on Flickr.

fuckyeahabandonedplaces:

Emptiness by newfrontier08 on Flickr.

atlasobscura:

FROM DEFENSE TO DESPERATION, WHY THERE IS A HIDDEN WORLD OF UNDERGROUND CITIES
BY CHRIS WHITE / 16 SEP 2014
The history of underground cities is a complex and meandering one, ranging from the Ancient Era in the Middle East and Europe to those sunk during the height of Cold War paranoia, such as the bunker complexes of Cheyenne Mountain or Beijing’s Underground City. There are also more recent underground cities, some of which are simply underground shopping centers or networks of tunneled roads, like those in Vancouver and Tokyo, as well as others which will begin to be built only in the future, due to the constraints of small islands and the opportunities for vast wealth, which are being considered in Singapore and in Hong Kong.
Read more…

atlasobscura:

FROM DEFENSE TO DESPERATION, WHY THERE IS A HIDDEN WORLD OF UNDERGROUND CITIES

BY CHRIS WHITE / 16 SEP 2014
The history of underground cities is a complex and meandering one, ranging from the Ancient Era in the Middle East and Europe to those sunk during the height of Cold War paranoia, such as the bunker complexes of Cheyenne Mountain or Beijing’s Underground City. There are also more recent underground cities, some of which are simply underground shopping centers or networks of tunneled roads, like those in Vancouver and Tokyo, as well as others which will begin to be built only in the future, due to the constraints of small islands and the opportunities for vast wealth, which are being considered in Singapore and in Hong Kong.

(Source: heronswing, via themadeshop)

archaeoart:

The gates of the Temple of Hathor at Dendera, Egypt, circa 1862.

archaeoart:

The gates of the Temple of Hathor at Dendera, Egypt, circa 1862.

(via crocket)

erikkwakkel:

Dog prints in medieval chained library

I made this image in the chained library “De Librije” in the Dutch city of Zutphen. Established in 1564, everything about this place is still precisely as it was, including the tiles on the floor. Remarkably, throughout the library there are tiles with a dog’s paw prints. These 450-year-old traces of a large dog come with a local legend. One night, a monk called Jaromir was reading in the library while enjoying a meal of chicken, delivered to him by some nuns. He was not supposed to do this: not only does one not eat in a library, but he was also going through a period of fasting. Then suddenly the devil appeared in the form of a dog, scaring the living daylights out of the monk. The devil ate the chicken and locked the monk inside as a punishment - as devils do. Knowing the story, it’s hard to ignore the prints when admiring the books. 

Pics (top my own): Zutphen, Librije Chained Library. More on the legend on the library’s website, also source for lower pic, here (in Dutch).

(via holeintheuniverse)